The Reviews

Some words of praise for Mazi’s light and crisp Rosé.

2019 Mazi Rosé

93 points
The Wine Front
Gary Walsh, December 2019

I’ve tried a few vintages of this informally when I visit Parisi’s restaurant in Adelaide. Pretty perfume, strawberry, exotic spice as a fine seasoning. It has a softness, and succulence of fruit, but comes over as dry and fragrant, with a gentle crunch of acidity, chalkiness and blood orange bitterness on a long satisfying finish.


2018 Mazi Rosé

2018 Mazi Rosé

The Weekend Australian
Nick Ryan, January 2019

The McLaren Vale subregion of Blewitt Springs is the most sought-after address for Australian grenache, and while it has been the fragrant and expressive reds from the area capturing most attention, this wine shows it can produce spectacular rose as well. It’s a pale, petally pink and offers up lifted aromas of quandongs, dried raspberries and a swirl of souk spices. It’s taut and linear, invigoratingly fresh upfront and beautifully tapered towards a fine, savoury finish.

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In golden age of pink wine McLaren Vale produces gem of rosé
By Nick Ryan, The Weekend Australian

January offers a chance for reflection within sight of water, with cricket on the radio and your toes having forgotten what it’s like to be trapped in shoes. This is ideal thinking time, and thinking is often aided by drinking, and when thinking and drinking through the languid infancy of a new year, the thoughtful glass is usually filled with wine the same colour as legs left a fraction too long on the beach.

I’ve been thinking a lot about the rise of rose, how we’re living in a golden age of pink wines, and how I’m still a little bit haunted by a wine I tried a few months back that turned out to be the best rose I drank all last year.

When I started out in the wine trade, rose was Mateus, Portugal’s second worst export after the millipede, or a handful of confected Australian examples various shades of neon pink, ranging from Drag Queen’s Lipstick to Barbie’s Boudoir. They were sickly sweet, more confected than Twitter outrage and as closely related to serious wine as an Adam Sandler movie is to Citizen Kane.

But now rose is afforded the respect it deserves. Where once there was pragmatism in pink wine — lightly stained juice was drained off early during maceration to concentrate the red wine being made and producing a quantity of pink wine that could be tricked up and sold off as rose — winemakers are treating the production of rose seriously. That means beginning the process with a quality rose as the goal, selecting the right vineyard sites, giving greater consideration to what varieties perform best in a paler guise and picking at slightly earlier maturity levels, where flavours and aromas are in the sweet spot for lively, vigorous rose.

Dedication towards the production of serious rose is spreading right across the Australian wine industry, but nowhere is it more keenly focused than in the pure pink play a pair of old friends have decided to call Mazi.

Toby Porter and Alex Katsaros have significant day jobs within wine. Porter is a winemaker at d’Arenberg in McLaren Vale and Katsaros is a winemaker with roving commission and the Australian agent for esteemed French cooper Tonnellerie Baron, but they’ve both been putting in a bit of overtime in pursuit of the pale grail.

They make only two wines and they’re both pink. Taking obvious stylistic cues from the great pink wines of southern France, and leveraging their good fortune to be working in McLaren Vale, the Australian region where the varieties that drive those French benchmarks are at their best, Porter and Katsaros are setting new benchmarks for rose in this country.

While both wines are distinctly different expressions, they share some strong common traits. They’re serious and savoury, fine and dry, and they clearly show the benefits of being built from the ground up and having been destined for pale pink greatness from the very beginning.

Mazi is a Greek word meaning togetherness, and if the early days of the Mazi project can produce results as impressive as the two wines from the 2018 vintage, those of us who love serious rose will be hoping Porter and Katsaros stick together for a long time to come.


2018 Mazi Limited Release Rosé

2018 Mazi Limited Release Rosé

The Weekend Australian
Nick Ryan, January 2019

If you’re serious about rose, buy as much of this as you can before every winemaking school in the country grabs it all to demonstrate to students just how good Australian rose can be. The wine is predominantly mourvedre (86 per cent with 10 per cent grenache and 4 per cent cinsault) and it’s that variety’s capacity for brooding savouriness that this wine celebrates. It’s an achingly pale colour, a whispered suggestion of pink, rather than a shouted statement. It smells of pink grapefruit, bitter orange, dried wild herbs and the sterner elements that give Campari its edge. It’s perfectly balanced, holding an incredibly disciplined line. The best Australian rose I’ve seen.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

In golden age of pink wine McLaren Vale produces gem of rosé
By Nick Ryan, The Weekend Australian

January offers a chance for reflection within sight of water, with cricket on the radio and your toes having forgotten what it’s like to be trapped in shoes. This is ideal thinking time, and thinking is often aided by drinking, and when thinking and drinking through the languid infancy of a new year, the thoughtful glass is usually filled with wine the same colour as legs left a fraction too long on the beach.

I’ve been thinking a lot about the rise of rose, how we’re living in a golden age of pink wines, and how I’m still a little bit haunted by a wine I tried a few months back that turned out to be the best rose I drank all last year.

When I started out in the wine trade, rose was Mateus, Portugal’s second worst export after the millipede, or a handful of confected Australian examples various shades of neon pink, ranging from Drag Queen’s Lipstick to Barbie’s Boudoir. They were sickly sweet, more confected than Twitter outrage and as closely related to serious wine as an Adam Sandler movie is to Citizen Kane.

But now rose is afforded the respect it deserves. Where once there was pragmatism in pink wine — lightly stained juice was drained off early during maceration to concentrate the red wine being made and producing a quantity of pink wine that could be tricked up and sold off as rose — winemakers are treating the production of rose seriously. That means beginning the process with a quality rose as the goal, selecting the right vineyard sites, giving greater consideration to what varieties perform best in a paler guise and picking at slightly earlier maturity levels, where flavours and aromas are in the sweet spot for lively, vigorous rose.

Dedication towards the production of serious rose is spreading right across the Australian wine industry, but nowhere is it more keenly focused than in the pure pink play a pair of old friends have decided to call Mazi.

Toby Porter and Alex Katsaros have significant day jobs within wine. Porter is a winemaker at d’Arenberg in McLaren Vale and Katsaros is a winemaker with roving commission and the Australian agent for esteemed French cooper Tonnellerie Baron, but they’ve both been putting in a bit of overtime in pursuit of the pale grail.

They make only two wines and they’re both pink. Taking obvious stylistic cues from the great pink wines of southern France, and leveraging their good fortune to be working in McLaren Vale, the Australian region where the varieties that drive those French benchmarks are at their best, Porter and Katsaros are setting new benchmarks for rose in this country.

While both wines are distinctly different expressions, they share some strong common traits. They’re serious and savoury, fine and dry, and they clearly show the benefits of being built from the ground up and having been destined for pale pink greatness from the very beginning.

Mazi is a Greek word meaning togetherness, and if the early days of the Mazi project can produce results as impressive as the two wines from the 2018 vintage, those of us who love serious rose will be hoping Porter and Katsaros stick together for a long time to come.


The Advertiser
Katie Spain, February 2019

A great write-up by the right wordsmith can destroy your chances of finding a decent bottle of wine. That’s why you’ll be hard-pressed to hunt down Mazi Wines’ 2018 Limited Release Rosé after Nick Ryan referred to being haunted by the drop (for all the right reasons) in The Australian recently.

Alex Katsaros and Toby Porter used hand-picked McLaren Vale mourvedre grapes to make it. You can still find their 2018 Mazi Rosé McLaren Vale if you act fast. Sommelier Liinaa Berry has had both drops on her 2KW wine list for a while now and Katsaros will be on hand to pour it during the rooftop venue’s 15 Shades of Rosé event on February 23.

“The limited release is so refined,” she says. “It’s an excellent expression of how good Australian rosé can be.” That’s the point of the three-hour event. To showcase the diversity of New World rosé and smash a few misconceptions in the process. “There’s a spectrum of colours in the rosé world and I want people to understand that the colour of rosé has nothing to do with how dry it is.”


Broadsheet Adelaide
Liinaa Berry, 2KW Sommelier, February 2019

On a visual note, I was immediately attracted to the very pale colour: so light, almost like a whisper from a secret lover. The taste took me to Provence. Made from hand-picked mourvedre, there is a gorgeous subtleness about it that makes this too easy to drink. It’s very impressive to have this lightness in Aussie rosé, but still offer plenty in the mouth with raspberry compote, spice and musk. I would drink it lying in a hammock in a lavender field; it’s 26 degrees and I’d be reading Murakami.